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How to Label Third Party Content in Creative Commons Licensed Material

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Creative Commons Information Pack

for Teachers and Students

                                              

This information guide was jointly developed by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Creative Industries and Innovation through Creative Commons Australia and the National Copyright Unit of the COAG Education Council.

For further information contact Creative Commons Australia at info@creativecommons.org.au.





Creative Commons licences are designed to let others know how they may use a work without infringing copyright. 

Therefore, if you are distributing information under a Creative Commons Licence, and it includes content that isn’t covered by the Creative Commons Licence, this material needs to be clearly identified.

 

Third Party Content

One category of content that you are unable to license under a Creative Commons licence is third party content.

This is content that is created by someone else, a third party, and as such you do not have the rights to license the content.  You may not have the rights for any number of reasons, eg, the content is protected by trademark, owned by someone else, or licensed under another licence (even if it is the same Creative Commons licence that you applied). 

For all third party content, you must prominently mark or indicate in a notice that this content is excluded from the Creative Commons licence.

How to Label Third Party Content

There is no single correct way to label third party content, and different situations may require more or less complicated notices and marking.

There are two often used mechanisms – you can do either or both of these, as appropriate for the medium:

 

  1. Giving a notice next to third party content

This involves marking or notating all third party content.  To do this you should indicate directly underneath the content. 

In addition to citing the source of copyright material, it is best practice to include the following information as well:  the owner of the copyright, the terms of use for the content, and how you are allowed to reproduce the content (whether that be through direct permission from the copyright owner, through a Creative Commons licence or through a statutory licence).

Example:  direct permission from the copyright owner to use content

‘Smith, J 2014, How to label third party content © National Copyright Unit, NSW, all rights reserved, used with permission.’ 

 

Example:  material licensed under Creative Commons

 

‘Smith, J 2014, How to label third party content, © NSW Department of Education & Communities, used under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licence.  To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.’


 

‘Edgar, S 2002, Mathematics Unplugged © Bristol Press, Copied under Part VB.’



2.      Giving a general notice listing all third party content

This involves giving a general notice that identifies all third party content.  This notice would usually be included in your terms of use or copyright statement for a website or in the verso page or bibliography for a work.

This notice should specifically identify all third party content.  This can be done by listing all the third party content specifically or, where possible, listing material based on content type.  

Example:  listing all the third party content

‘All material on this website, except as identified below, is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licence.  To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.’

 Material that is not licenced under a Creative Commons licence is:

  • Commonwealth Coat of Arms
  • Material protected by a trade mark
  • Logo
  • Photographs on pages 4, 5 and 6
  • Poem on page 2
  • [Etc]

 All content not licensed under a Creative Commons licence is all rights reserved, and you must request permission from the copyright owner to use this material.’ 



Example:  identifying third party content by content type

 

‘All text on this website is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licence.  To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.’ 

 All images are all rights reserved, and you must request permission from the copyright owner to use this material.’



3.     Giving a general notice and a notice next to third party content

This involves giving a general notice that indicates any third party content will be identified, and then identifying the third party content within the website/work. 

This general notice would usually be included in your terms of use or copyright statement for a website or in the verso page or bibliography for a work.

Example: general notice for a website

‘Copyright material available on this website is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licence.  To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.’


Example:  general notice for a document

 

‘Except as otherwise noted, this [insert name of content] is licenced under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licence.  To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.’

 
Then next to all third party content you can include a notice regarding the relevant copyright owner and the material’s terms of use and, where possible, the licence or permission you’ve received from the copyright owner.  

Example:  direct permission from the copyright owner to use content

 

‘Smith, J 2014, How to label third party content © National Copyright Unit, NSW, all rights reserved, used with permission.’



Example:  material licensed under Creative Commons

 

‘Smith, J 2014, How to label third party content, © NSW Department of Education & Communities, used under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licence.  To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.’



Example: material copied pursuant to Part VB Statutory Licence

  Edgar, S 2002, Mathematics Unplugged © Bristol Press, Copied under Part VB.’


With whatever method you choose, the most important thing is that you clearly and effectively identify third party material.